The Model Engineering Section

of the Internet Craftsmanship Museum

Three years of drawing and twelve years of construction went into this 1/3 scale fully functional Ferrari 312 PB by Pierre Scerri of France. There are not many people who will follow a dream or stick with a project for that long, but people who build masterpieces like the ones shown here have a level of determination that goes beyond what most of us are willing to do. All of the projects shown here are measured in years to build and require the learning and mastery of many new skills before they can be completed. These are truly the best of the best.

Model Engineering Masterpieces

Building a running internal combustion engine is a difficult task, but the additional challenges posed by constructing the complete car puts these model engineers in a class by themselves. Other model engineering projects that involve a mastery of many different techniques and disciplines will also be included in this section.

 (Click for larger image)

Craftsman (Click name to visit page on this craftsman)

Typical Project (Click for larger image)

Ernie Adams

5/8 scale dwarf race cars and miniature street legal hotrods

Iqbal Ahmed

Sherline Machinist's Challenge Contest Winner, 2007

A running 1/4 scale 1886 Benz Motorwagen—The "first automobile"

A running 1/4 scale 1896 Ford Quadracycle—Henry Ford's first automobile

Louis Chenot

2011 Metalworking Craftsman of the Decade, Carl Junction, MO

A 1/6 scale 1932 Duesenberg SJ that runs.

Ingvar Dahlberg

A 40% size 1910 Mercer T35 Raceabout from Sweden

Ron Guttu

A 1/4 size Offenhauser-powered dirt car like dad used to race

Jerry Kieffer

1997 Metalworking Craftsman of the Year, DeForest, WI

A 1/8 scale John Deere Tractor that works to the smallest detail, a 1/8 scale Harley Davidson motorcycle that is a project in progress plus many other tiny masterpieces

Pierre Scerri

2007 Metalworking Craftsman of the Year, Avignon, France

A running 1/3 scale Ferrari that took 15 years to build

Links to other model engineering sections:

Section 1: Internal combustion engines

Section 2: Steam, Stirling and other engines

Section 3: Other Model Engineering Projects

horizontal rule

New Submissions Welcomed

If you have additional information on a project or builder shown on this site that your would like to contribute, please e-mail craig@CraftsmanshipMuseum.com. We also welcome new contributions. Please see our page at www.CraftsmanshipMuseum.com/newsubmit.htm for a submission form and guidelines for submitting descriptive copy and photos for a new project.

horizontal rule

This section is sponsored by SHERLINE PRODUCTS INC., Vista, CA,
manufacturers of tabletop machine tools and accessories.

To learn how your company or organization can sponsor a section in the Craftsmanship Museum, please contact craig@CraftsmanshipMuseum.com.

RETURN TO MUSEUM HOME PAGE

Copyright 2009, The Joe Martin Foundation for Exceptional Craftsmanship. All rights reserved.
 No part of this web site, including the text, photos or illustrations, may be reproduced or transmitted in any other form or by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise) for commercial use without the prior written permission of The Joe Martin Foundation. Reproduction or reuse for educational and non-commercial use is permitted.